Early Fall Chinook Salmon Run

Chinook
edited September 2005 in Catch Reports
Heard that the Chinook (salmon) had initiated its Fall migration up the Sacramento River from
the Pacific Ocean. So early this morning, my friend Jacob and I walked down to the river to fish
for salmon. There were already about 10 fishermen spread along the banks actively casting out
lures for salmon. We found a spot and began tossing out our lures too!



«1
  • Chinook
    I used a Cabelas' Fish Eagle 10-foot rod and a Daiwa 2600-C Silver Series spinning reel spooled
    with 15-lb test copolymer line. For lures, we used the Blue Fox Vibrax spinners with a red or chatruese
    with chrome blades. These were the same lures that were very effective on silver salmon up in Alaska
    two weeks ago.



  • Chinook
    My friend Jacob had the 1st strike around 7:00AM and the fish followed and took his Vibrax spinner
    about 15 feet from the bank. The sudden "ZZZZZZZ" sound of his drag announced a hooked fish
    and it took off like a runaway freight train downriver. Up and downriver, the Chinook salmon sped - fighting
    gamely like a true "King" salmon before finally coming to the net after a 5-minute battle.




  • Chinook
    We netted the fish and weighed it. It was just a tad over 15-lbs and was a hen loaded with roe.




  • Chinook
    After tying up the salmon to a rock by the river, we returned tossing out our Vibrax spinners again
    into the Sacramento River for salmon. I have not had a strike yet on this morning so far. Within
    15-minutes, my friend Jacob who was fishing beside me had another strike and his reel went
    screaming with joy as the Chinook headed downriver. This was a much bigger Chinook as there
    was nothing Jacob could do to turn the fish around except to hang onto his rod for dear life.



  • Chinook
    Here is a video of the 2nd Chinook salmon being brought in to be netted after a 10-minute battle


  • Old Man
    WoW ! Nice playground . Cheers !
  • Chinook
    Finall, after an exhausting 10-minute battle with the Chinook salmon, Jacob managed to guide it
    in close to the riverbank to be netted. It weighed a whopping 26-lbs (11.82 Kg) and it was a male
    characterised by the tell-tale hooked upper jaw.




  • Chinook
    Since there were more than enough salmon for both of us, we decided to call it a day and head for home
    and for breakfast. It had been a very productive morning for Jacob. As for myself - there's always
    tomorrow or another day.




  • Chinook
    We decided to come back again tomorrow morning to see if that school of Chinook salmon is still around.
    Maybe we may be lucky enough again to catch a few more. Smoked salmon do taste wonderful as
    an anytime snack!



  • Ghani
    Chinook,

    Great event by event CR bro. Keep it coming.

    Cheers
    Ghani
  • Angler X
    Yum Yum ! Those Salmon looks big and Yummy.
  • FRiEDfish
    Those are some MEAN salmon you have there :smt040 !

    Great catch!
  • yc
    hi Chinook,

    wonderful fishing ground and good catch.

    may i ask one curious/stupid question. what is the reason u wrap ur rod with plastic??

    Cheers...
  • Ed
    Chinook,

    Are the chinook salmons also known as Pacific Ocean salmons? Any insights on their breed and family line?

    Are these the typical salmon that go into our daily sandwich and sushi.... :smt106
  • Chinook
    yc" said:hi Chinook,
    What is the reason u wrap ur rod with plastic??
    Cheers...


    Hi YC,
    The plastic wrapping prevents bait (ie. cut sardine or salmon roe), fish blood, etc. from permeating
    into the cork handle of the rod. The smell of the bait, fish blood, etc. absorbed into the cork handle
    of the rod over a period of time will result in an unpleasant and fishy odor. I change the plastic
    wrapping about 3 times a year. Rod handle stays clean and odor-free. No fuss, no muss.
    Regards.
  • Chinook
    Ed" said:Chinook,
    Are the chinook salmons also known as Pacific Ocean salmons? Any insights on their breed and
    family line? Are these the typical salmon that go into our daily sandwich and sushi.... :smt106

    Hi Ed,
    Chinook (or King) salmon are the largest (size-wise) of the Pacific Ocean salmon. Other Pacific Ocean
    salmon includes the Coho (silver), Chum (Sockeye), etc. All salmon are anadromous fish - they grow
    into adult fish over 3-5 years in the ocean before returning to spawn in the exact spot in the river where
    they themselves were hatched. After spawning, both the male and female salmon will die. By late November,
    the river will be littered with the carcasses of dead salmon which in turn provide food to other creatures.
    Unless labelled as "Wild Salmon" on the packaged salmon you purchase in the supermarket - it probably
    is a farmed Atlantic salmon. Norway is the top producer of farmed salmon in the world with Chile
    coming in second. Could be either wild or farmed salmon in your sandwich.
  • Chinook
    Walked down to the Sacramento River with my friend Jacob again this morning at 6AM. As usual,
    there were already a few die-hard fishermen there fishing along the banks of the river for salmon.
    We were actively working the river with our Blue Fox Vibrax spinner lures around 7AM when another
    fisherman near us yelled "Fish on!" We could see that he was into a good-sized fish by the splashes and
    the dorsal fin of the salmon breaking water and it took him about 5 minutes before he managed to
    guide the salmon in close enough by the riverbank to be netted.




  • Chinook
    Not long after that salmon was caught, a big seal surfaced in the middle d of the river and was headed upstream.
    Seals have been swimming upriver from the San Francisco bay over the past few years following the salmon and
    striped bass spawning runs. The seals have figured out that it is much easier to catch fish in a river than in the
    wide open bay by the ocean. By 8AM, we decided to head on home for breakfast as the action was pretty dead by then.




  • ShadowCaster
    Chinook" said:
    [quote="Ed"]Chinook,
    Are the chinook salmons also known as Pacific Ocean salmons? Any insights on their breed and
    family line? Are these the typical salmon that go into our daily sandwich and sushi.... :smt106
    Hi Ed,
    Chinook (or King) salmon are the largest (size-wise) of the Pacific Ocean salmon. Other Pacific Ocean
    salmon includes the Coho (silver), Chum (Sockeye), etc. Could be either wild or farmed salmon in your sandwich.[/quote]

    Chinook,

    Just a minor clarification, Chum salmon and Sockeye are actually different species. Chum are frequently call "dog" salmon and are allegely the worst tasting among the 5 species of Pacific salmon. Long time ago, the native Alaskan frequently feed Chum salmon to their dogs, hence the name. Sockeye on the other hand are commonly considered the best eating (although Chinook lover would disagree) of the Pacific salmon. Sockeye are also called red salmon as their body turn into bright crimson red color 2-3week after they run up river. For a little more information on fishing for sockeye, see the following link : http://flyfishingsg.proboards38.com/ind ... 1120035476

    All the salmon we get at our local Singaporean super market and wet market are farmed atlantic salmon. Some canned salmon are actually humpy salmon or chum salmon. Wild Chinook and sockeye are simply too expensive to be canned. The taste between a wild and farmed salmon are worlds apart!
  • FISHUNTER
    Well Done Pls keep it coming. Love to see all these photo.
    =D> =D> =D> =D> =D>
  • Chinook
    Chinook,
    Just a minor clarification, Chum salmon and Sockeye are actually different species. Chum are
    frequently call "dog" salmon and are allegely the worst tasting among the 5 species of Pacific salmon.
    Long time ago, the native Alaskan frequently feed Chum salmon to their dogs, hence the name.

    Thank you for your kind clarification and background pertaining to the dog salmon.

    Sockeye on the other hand are commonly considered the best eating (although Chinook lover
    would disagree) of the Pacific salmon. Sockeye are also called red salmon as their body turn
    into bright crimson red color 2-3week after they run up river.

    The reds were actively spawning in Cottonwood Creek in 2-foot deep water (close by the condo
    where I stayed) 2 weeks ago in Alaska when I was there. Some of them were huge - over 3-feet
    in length. I used to fish for the landlocked version of the sockeye (kokanee) salmon in a few
    lakes in California and they are superb when smoked.

    The taste between a wild and farmed salmon are worlds apart!
    I am in complete agreement with you on that! Regards.
  • yc
    Chinook" said:
    [quote="yc"]hi Chinook,
    What is the reason u wrap ur rod with plastic??
    Cheers...
    Hi YC,
    The plastic wrapping prevents bait (ie. cut sardine or salmon roe), fish blood, etc. from permeating
    into the cork handle of the rod. The smell of the bait, fish blood, etc. absorbed into the cork handle
    of the rod over a period of time will result in an unpleasant and fishy odor. I change the plastic
    wrapping about 3 times a year. Rod handle stays clean and odor-free. No fuss, no muss.
    Regards.[/quote]

    Hi Chinook,

    Thanks for answering my question. At first, i thought it was for preventing water to go in to the soft part of rod handle. now i know why :D
  • jambul
    yc" said:
    [quote="Chinook"][quote="yc"]hi Chinook,
    What is the reason u wrap ur rod with plastic??
    Cheers...
    Hi YC,
    The plastic wrapping prevents bait (ie. cut sardine or salmon roe), fish blood, etc. from permeating
    into the cork handle of the rod. The smell of the bait, fish blood, etc. absorbed into the cork handle
    of the rod over a period of time will result in an unpleasant and fishy odor. I change the plastic
    wrapping about 3 times a year. Rod handle stays clean and odor-free. No fuss, no muss.
    Regards.[/quote]

    Hi Chinook,

    Thanks for answering my question. At first, i thought it was for preventing water to go in to the soft part of rod handle. now i know why :D[/quote]


    Hi Chinook,
    Just wondering whether it would be better to seal the cork instead. I normally use candle wax...just rub a candle on the cork and even it out with a hair dryer. That way, the thin layer of wax will spread evenly. If you need to remove the wax, simply use the hair dryer again. Works well for me.
    Just a suggestion.
  • Chinook
    Hi Chinook,
    Just wondering whether it would be better to seal the cork instead. I normally use candle wax...just
    rub a candle on the cork and even it out with a hair dryer. That way, the thin layer of wax will spread
    evenly. If you need to remove the wax, simply use the hair dryer again. Works well for me. Just a suggestion.


    Hi Jamul,
    Sounds like an excellent idea. During the summer here, the daytime temperatures can surpass
    100-degrees Fahrenheight (37.8+ degree Celcius) and candlewax will liquidify. Have you experienced
    that with the wax on your rod handle? Shrink-wrap would be the ideal choice if one has access to it.
    Regards.
  • Michael Lim
    Shrink wrap??

    we have that here locally in abundance. We use them to wrap our bamboo poles for airing our clothes. Multi-coloured and easy to apply too...

    Hot water and it'll just cling on tight... You want some?
  • jambul
    Michael Lim" said:
    Shrink wrap??

    we have that here locally in abundance. We use them to wrap our bamboo poles for airing our clothes. Multi-coloured and easy to apply too...

    Hot water and it'll just cling on tight... You want some?

    I don't think shrink wrap will work as it can get very slippery when wet. Last thing you want is to have a rod slip out of your hands whan you have a fish on.

    I don't know how hot candle wax can withstand but never had any problems here...including my saltwater rods
  • Michael Lim
    The alternative shrink wrap would be the rubber ones for wires (but I dun know how thick they can get to....)

    I have used some for wire protection and they are great and holds very well.


    Cheers,
  • Anonymous
    Why not use cork sealant?! Once you applied it, will water proof, dirt proof and protect the cork as well. You only need to do it once and for all, hassle free mate.
  • Chinook
    edited September 2005
    Michael Lim" said:Shrink wrap??
    we have that here locally in abundance. Hot water and it'll just cling on tight... You want some?


    Hi Mike,
    Thanks for your kind offer. Appreciate it greatly. I should check into that shrink rubber wrap for wires
    too. Do you know whether they make it big enough to fit over a fishing rod handle? The shrink
    wrap I've seen uses a hair-dryer type blower to shrink it.
    Regards.
  • Chinook
    Jack Lai" said:Why not use cork sealant?! Once you applied it, will water proof, dirt proof and
    protect the cork as well. You only need to do it once and for all, hassle free mate.


    Have to check into this too. Sounds like another viable alternative too. Thanks for the tip! Regards
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