What Weight Jigs Do I Bring To Local Water, Singapore?

Luke Maow Bear
edited August 2017 in Jigging & Popping


This is a question that came up on the FishingKaki Facebook Groups, https://www.facebook.com/groups/fishingkakicommunity/

I would like to know what is the best weight of jig to be used in singapore water?

You need to prepare for various situations.

1/ Wind

2/ Current

3/ Depth

4/ Type of Jigging < < The Answer is at 4/, so scroll if you don't want to read)

____________________________

Wind

How hard the wind is blowing determines how fast the boat will drift, it also will determine what weight of jig you use.

If the wind is blowing hard, the boat is going to drift fast; you are going to need a heavier jig to get to the bottom so that the jig does not "layang" or kite away from the boat and you may never really touch the bottom.

The boat is going drift in the direction that the wind is going.

So if the wind is blowing left to right, the boat is going to drift right; where the wind is going.


The side you will be fishing will be the Windward side, the other side is called the Leeward Side.

Why fish the Windward side?

You fish on the Windward side because when you drop a jig on this side, the jig is moving away from you.

If you drop it on the Leeward side, the jig will be coming towards you and may go under the boat, your line hits the bottom of the boat and you damage your line or a fish takes and goes under the boat or you wrap your line and your rod goes down and your rod breaks; all sorts of things can go wrong on the Leeward Side.

But there is a way to fish the Leeward side, you cast with the wind and work your jig back close to the bottom by keeping your rod down and working it like a lure. It works wonders and you can get away with smaller jigs, I recommend a 40 Grams Jig to do this in Southern Islands and as low as a 10 Gram Jig around Changi area, but do note that the depths plummet around the ship anchorage area.

Current

When the boat is drifting the current can add another variable, I personally ignore it. I pay attention to the Wind more than the current, when the current is moving from the Leeward side and pushing your jig then you are silly situation; your jig is going to kite even more. Just use a heavier jig, done. 

Don't look too deeply into it, the whole kiting issue can be solved by a heavier jig; barring a lighter line which helps to bring down water resistance, but more on that later.

Depth

This is a variable that directly effects how far your jig drifts away from you; the kite. The further your jig has to go down the more line goes out. The easy way to think of this is the more line out the more water will "grab" your line and carry out further with the drift.

Line thickness + leader thickness + jig weight = speed of drop

/ Line Thickness: The thinner your line is the less the water can "grab" it giving less resistance thus allowing your jig to go down faster.

/Leader Thickness: Like the line thickness, it directly impacts how fast your line goes down, however leader is less pitted so it tends to be more aquadynamic. Less pitted because your main line has 4 to 8 braids be it Power Pro type Dyneema lines or PE. However, Fireline is fused and more continuous in nature. So using 4lb Fireline is the goto line for micro jigging, because if you look at the formula:

Micro Jigging
[Line thicknes (4lb) + line thickness (12lb) + jig weight 12 Grams = speed of drop] will allow you to fish deeper water.

Type of Jigging

So you know how Micro Jigging setups should look like what else is there?

This is where the question gets answered, What Weight Jigs Do I Use In Local Water?

1/ 7 Grams to 18 Grams (32 Grams Soare), Micro Jigging is about form factor or size of shape of the jig, so even though the Tungsten based Soare is 32 Grams, you getaway with calling it Micro Jigging.

2/ (Recommended) 20 Grams to 40 Grams, Light Jigging is the more generalised category and this is what you should stock up the most of. Bring x3 60 Gram jigs as it is highly likely the rod you are using for your 20 Gram and 40 Gram will jig up to 100 (which is wrong), so you will be able to jig to max of 60 Grams comfortably where you can impart true action to the jig. The delay of a 100 Gram jig on more light jigging rods is just too much for me to bother with it.

x3 20 Gram Jigs
x6 40 Gram Jigs
x3 60 Gram Jigs

That is a bare-bare minimum you can get away with when you go jigging; just be warned, I have lost x15 40 Gram jigs in one day. But out of a year that's very very rare.

3/ 80 Grams to 150 Grams, Not So Light Jigging is the last weight of jigs I will bring around Singapore's waters. I actually use this weight and use a 5000 sized reel, it's the "anything come" approach.

Apologies to slow jigging enthusiasts as it's simply not my thing and so I can't comment.

Hope this helps the question,
Peace Out,
LMB
  • Limpeh


    You wanna go into the rod and reel selection as well? :D

    Confused on the rod spec respect to the jig weight.
  • alien36706

    ;) Very useful information..

    A pity jigs can be so expensive nowadays especially those TG jigs.

  • Luke Maow Bear

    ;) Very useful information..

    A pity jigs can be so expensive nowadays especially those TG jigs.

    The micro TG Jigs are worth it.
  • moks1
    Green color jigg more effective..
  • Luke Maow Bear
    Ups. A lot of people ask this every week.
  • Michael Lim
    Bring everything including the kitchen sink....
  • Luke Maow Bear
    Bring everything including the kitchen sink....
    ​And kitchen counter.
  • Michael Lim
    Bring everything including the kitchen sink....
    ​And kitchen counter.
    ​Almost....  I got deba knife, spike, cooler box, fishing bag, rain gear on top of my fishing gear...
  • Senght
    Why do you pay more attention to wind than current? Is it because the wind has a greater impact on "kiting".

    also how does current feature with regards to bite rate? Does tide feature as well? 
  • Luke Maow Bear
    Senght said:
    Why do you pay more attention to wind than current? Is it because the wind has a greater impact on "kiting".

    also how does current feature with regards to bite rate? Does tide feature as well? 
    ​Because it is the one impact that we as anglers can read easily from a moving boat and that has a direct controllable influence on the kite, the current would have to be blistering to directly impact your kite.
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